FAQs



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What is fascia?
Fascia is a web of connective tissue that surrounds muscle groups, individual units of muscle, organs and bones. The sheets of fascia should slide on each other to keep the body mobile and healthy. However, fascia responds to stress placed on a person’s body (e.g. the pull of gravity on a badly aligned posture) by creating more or less of itself in the areas of the body that are under stress to protect joints and other structures. This results in the fascial sheets sticking to each other and pulling on each other, which can disturb the body’s natural alignment and possibly lead to injury.
The Rolfing touch aims to restore the elasticity and the sliding capacity of the fascia and to realign the body in such a way that it can function optimally.

This film illustrates the sliding capacities of the fascial layers as they look under the skin in a living human body. It is filmed during a wrist surgery.

Who can benefit from Rolfing?
Anyone can benefit from Rolfing. Rolfing often resolves recurring injuries and pains if these are caused by misalignment. Dancers, athletes and other active people often find that the subtle changes to their movement patterns, facilitated by Rolfing, leads to an improved performance. After completing 10 sessions with a Certified Rolfer™ a client can expect to experience a greater sense of all over freedom, better posture and improved movement as well as better body awareness. Many clients also report positive emotional and psychological changes after completing the course.

What can I expect from a typical Rolfing session?
A Rolfing session lasts 90 minutes. The Rolfer will do an assessment, which will include the clients presenting problems and posture analysis. The posture analysis is done in underwear or shorts and sportsbra. If the client wishes to document the changes, photos may be taken at certain points throughout the Rolfing process.
Rolfing has often been described as very painful, and at times it can feel quite intense, however there are also gentle parts of the process and the Rolfer always works within the clients pain limit. Rolfing is an active process which requires teamwork between the Rolfer and the client.

Can I continue to do sports and my other daily activities during the time I get Rolfed?
Some people feel energized after the sessions, while some feel so relaxed that they need to schedule a gap in their day of 30 minutes or more after the session before they return to the office. After the first session you will know how you react to the work and we can plan the following sessions accordingly.
It is advisable not to do heavy sports on the same day as receiving the session as the changes in the body need to settle, however gentle exercise such as going for a walk or a swim is useful especially if these activities are done slowly enough to allow awareness to the new patterns in the body. Generally my experience is that it is beneficial to continue your daily activities throughout the Rolfing process, but to do them with a different awareness to your body than usually.
 

Does Rolfing hurt
Rolfing has often been described as very painful, and at times it can feel quite intense, however there are also gentle parts of the process and the Rolfer always works within the clients pain limit. Rolfing is an active process which requires teamwork between the Rolfer and the client and feedback from the client about any pain, intense feeling, or feeling of change in the body is always encouraged.